My Ultimate Reading List

Growing up in a small town, I wasn’t exposed to a lot of literature. Mainly the fantasy novels found in my school library, but not much of anything else. I’m in my twenties now and there is still a lot of works that are usually considered as “Must Reads.” So, I created my own Reading List. Though ideas have come from all over the place but a lot of this comes from my own desires to read almost everything.

Everyone says that to be a good writer you have to read a lot. Well, there is a lot that I want to read. Many books on this list will be featured on my What Are You Reading? series so keep an eye out! 🙂

As sort of a key to keep myself straight:

Owned Books will be colored Green

Read Books will be Linked (With Dates)


1. A Brief History of Time – Stephen Hawking
2. Hamlet – Shakespeare
3. The Scarlet Letter – Nathaniel Hawthorn
4. Macbeth – Shakespeare
5. Catch-22 – Joseph Heller
6. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
7. 1984 – George Orwell
8. Frankenstein – Mary Shelley (October 2015)
9. The Sun Also Rises – Ernest Hemingway (December 2015)
10. The Metamorphosis – Franz Kafka
11. The Call of the Wild – Jack London (January 2015)
12. Dune – Frank Herbert
13. The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
14. The Iliad – Homer
15. The Road – Cormac McCarthy
16. The Odyssey – Homer
17. The Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
18. The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
19. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – Ken Kesey
20. Death of a Salesman – Arthur Miller
21. Treasure Island – Robert Louis Stevenson
22. The Stand – Stephen King
23. The Catcher in they Rye – J.D. Salinger (July 2014)
24. The Hobbit – J.R.R. Tolkein
25. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Mark Twain
26. Murder on the Orient Express – Agatha Christie
27. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams (January 2016)
28. Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
29. The Last of the Mohicans – James Fenimore Cooper
30. Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
31. A Death in the Family – James Agee
32. Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury (February 2016)
33. The Divine Comedy – Dante (August 2014, September 2014)
34. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Arthur Conan Doyle
35. Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte (September 2015)
36. Don Quixote – Miguel de Cervantes
37. Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
38. Invisible Man – Ralph Ellison
39. Lord of the Flies – William Golding
40. The Canterbury Tales – Geoffery Chaucer
41. The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald
42. Vanity Fair – William Thackeray (August 2015)
43. Candide – Voltaire (July 2015)
44. Night – Elie Wiesel
45. Rabbit, Run – John Updike
46. Slaughterhouse-Five – Kurt Vonnegut
47. Gone With the Wind – Margret Mitchell
48. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland – Lewis Carrol (March 2016)
49. David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
50. A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
51. A Doll’s House – Henrick Ibsen
52. Wrinkle in Time – Madeline L’Engle
53. The Chronicles of Narnia – C.S. Lewis
54. Moby Dick – Herman Belville
55. The Crucible – Arthur Miller
56. Animal Farm – George Orwell
57. Where the Red Fern Grows – Wilson Rawls
58. Cyrano de Bergerac – Edmond Rosmond
59. Pygmailon – George Bernard Shaw (May 2015)
60. Antiogone – Sophocles
61. East of Eden – John Steinbeck (April 2015)
62. The Lord of the Rings -J.R.R. Tolkein
63. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Mark Twain
64. 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea – Jules Verne
65. Once and Future King – T.H. White
66. Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card
67. The Power of Habit – Charles Duhigg
68. Steal Like an Artist – Austin Klenon
69. The Accidental Creative – Todd Henry
70. The Joy of Less – Francine Jay
71. Daring Greatly – Brene Brown
72. The Princess Bride – William Goldman (June 2015)
73. War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
74. The Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
75. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
76. Black Beauty – Anna Sewell
77. Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
78. Ulysses – James Joyce
79. The Godfather – Mario Puzo
80. The Alchemist – Paulo Coelho
81. How to be a Hepburn in a Hilton World – Jordan Christy
82. The Six Wives of Henry VIII – Alison Weir
83. Les Miserables – Victor Hugo
84. Dracula – Bram Stoker
85. Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov (May 2014)
86. The Beauty Myth – Naomi Wolf
87. Nicholas and Alexandra – Robert K. Massie
88. Mary Boleyn – Alison Weir
89. The Maid and The Queen – Nancy Goldstone
90. Guns, Germs, and Steel – Jared Diamond
91. The Gift of Fear: and other Survival Signals that Protect us from Violence – Gavin de Becker
92. Mad Women – Jane Maas
93. The Sociopath Next Door – Martha Stout
94. Notorious Royal Marriages – Leslie Carroll
95. The Tudors – G.J. Meyer
96. Cleopatra – Stacy Schiff
97. Captive Queen – Alison Weir
98. The Know-It-All – A.J. Jacobs
99. Georgiana – Amanda Foreman
100. The Body Project – Joan Jacobs Brumberg
101. Bad Girls – Jane Yolen and Heidi E. Y. Stemple
102. Passionate Minds – David Bodanie
103. Metaphysics – Aristotle
104. The Scarlet Pimpernel – Baroness Orczy (June 2014)
105. The Complete Grimm Fairy Tales – The Grimm Brothers

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4 thoughts on “My Ultimate Reading List

  1. Some of these are still on my TBR list. 🙂 I suggest Door Into Ocean by Joan Slonczewski. Self Reliance- by Ralph Waldo Emerson. 🙂 When I know what you are reading, maybe I will try to keep up. Good luck!

  2. If you want to read Asian writers like Khaled Hosseini, try his book A thousand Splendid Suns. His bestseller The Kite Runner was also made into a movie. He writes about Afghanistan and how life was pro and post war for different Afghani people across the globe. A roller coaster of emotions and feelings. He writes beautifully! Then there are some awesome Pakistani and Indian writers too. If you are interested I can always give you more names:)

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